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Conor O'Mahony's Database Diary

Your source of IBM database software news (DB2, Informix, Hadoop, & more)

Posts Tagged ‘DB2 for LUW

Announcing DB2 10 & InfoSphere Warehouse 10

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Today, IBM announced DB2 10 and InfoSphere Warehouse 10. You can read about these new releases in the Press Release and on the IBM Web site. Highlights of the new releases include:

  • Performance is up to 3.3x faster than previous release for complex query workloads*
  • The new Adaptive Compression has provided 7x or greater overall space savings for more than one client, with some tables achieving 10x space savings**
  • In DB2 10 Early Access Program testing, DB2 obtained an average of 98% compatibility with Oracle PL/SQL***
  • DB2 NoSQL Graph Store Accelerates Rational Use Case by up to 3.5x****

Check out the following great video from one of our Early Access Program participants:

For more information about these releases, make sure to visit the Launch Virtual Event.

* Based on internal tests of IBM DB2 9.7 FP3 vs. DB2 10.1 with new compression features on P6-550 systems with comparable specifications using data warehouse / decision support workloads, as of 4/3/2012.
** Based on client testing in the DB2 10 Early Access Program.
*** Based on internal tests and reported client experience from 28 Sep 2011 to 07 Mar 2012.
**** Based on internal benchmark tests of Rational Jazz graph store usage, comparing DB2 10 Graph Store with Jena TDB version 0.8.10.

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Written by Conor O'Mahony

April 3, 2012 at 9:32 am

Posted in DB2 for LUW

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Baltic Bank Moves from Oracle to DB2 to Improve Performance, Lower Costs, and Increase Availability

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JSC Rietumu Banka is one of the largest banks in the Baltic states. They recently migrated their data from Oracle Database on Sun servers to IBM DB2 on Power Systems servers, and enjoyed the following bebefits:

  • Up to 30 times faster query performance
  • 20-30% reduction in total cost of ownership
  • 200% improvement in data availability

Like many major banks, JSC Rietumu Banka faced recent pressure to reduce IT costs. In particular, they were concerned with total cost of hardware, software, and staffing for their banking applications which used Oracle Database on Sun servers. After a thorough technical and financial evaluation, JSC Rietumu Banka chose to migrate their environment to DB2 on Power Systems servers.

Of course, the ease of migration was a significant factor in JSC Rietumu Banka being able to achieve these benefits. For more information about the “compatibility features” that make it easy to migrate from Oracle Database to IBM DB2, see Gartner: IBM DB2′s Maturing Oracle Compatibility Presents Opportunities, with some Limitations.

To learn more about this specific migration, read the full IBM case study.

Written by Conor O'Mahony

March 4, 2012 at 9:05 pm

Coca Cola Bottling Move from Oracle Database to IBM DB2

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At the 2011 IBM Information On Demand (IOD) Conference, Coca Cola Bottling spoke about their experiences when moving from Oracle Database to IBM DB2. I have included some very brief video segments shot at the conference below. It is really interesting to heard about the experiences and impact of switching from Oracle to IBM from the people involved.

In the following short video segment, hear how Coca Cola Bottling have changed their fix pack philosophy as a result of moving. With Oracle Database, they would avoid fix packs unless they “had to”. But with DB2, applying fix packs is much easier and faster, providing faster access to new functionality, performance improvements, and bug fixes. Also, hear about how Coca Cola Bottling have had significant data storage savings thanks to moving to DB2. Who wouldn’t want to reclaim some of that IT budget allocated for storage purchases 🙂

And finally, hear about their experiences with performance boosts and the autonomic computing capabilities in DB2.

Written by Conor O'Mahony

February 23, 2012 at 11:07 am

Win a Trip to the IDUG Conference of your Choice

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DB2Night ShowThe International DB2 User Group (IDUG) is a user-run organization. If you want independent information about DB2, IDUG is the place to go. This year, IDUG are have conferences in the US (Denver), Germany (Berlin), and Australia (Sydney). The good news is that the DB2night Show is holding a contest, and the prize is an all expenses-paid trip to the IDUG conference of your choice. The contest aims to identify new users who can speak about their experiences with DB2. It’s a talent contest of sorts, where the talent is sharing your experiences. If you have ever considered speaking at a conference, this contest is the ideal way to see how you might do in a fun setting.

Written by Conor O'Mahony

January 25, 2012 at 2:01 pm

Anatomy of an Oracle Marketing Claim

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Yesterday, Oracle announced a new TPC-C benchmark result. They claim:

In this benchmark, the Sun Fire X4800 M2 server equipped with eight Intel® Xeon® E7-8870 processors and 4TB of Samsung’s Green DDR3 memory, is nearly 3x faster than the best published eight-processor result posted by an IBM p570 server equipped with eight Power 6 processors and running DB2. Moreover, Oracle Database 11g running on the Sun Fire X4800 M2 server is nearly 60 percent faster than the best DB2 result running on IBM’s x86 server.

Let’s have a closer look at this claim, starting with the first part: “nearly 3x faster than the best published eight-processor result posted by an IBM p570 server“. Interestingly, Oracle do not lead by comparing their new leading x86 result with IBM’s leading x86 result. Instead they choose to compare their new result to an IBM result from 2007, exploiting the fact that even though this IBM result was on a different platform, it uses the same number of processors. Of course, we all know that the advances in hardware, storage, networking, and software technology over half a decade are simply too great to form any basis for reasonable comparison. Thankfully, most people will see straight through this shallow attempt by Oracle to make themselves look better than they are. I cannot imagine any reasonable person claiming that Oracle’s x86 solutions offer 3x the performance of IBM’s Power Systems solutions, when comparing today’s technology. I’m sure most people will agree that this first comparison is simply meaningless.

Okay, now let’s look at the second claim: “nearly 60 percent faster than the best DB2 result running on IBM’s x86 server“. Oracle now compare their new leading x86 result with IBM’s leading x86 result. However, if you look at the benchmark details, you will see that IBM’s result uses half the number of CPU processors, CPU cores, and CPU threads. If you look at performance per core, the Oracle result achieves 60,046 tpmC per CPU core, while the IBM result achieves 75,367 tpmC per core. While Oracle claims to be 60% faster, if you take into account relevant system size and determine the performance per core, IBM is actually 25% faster than Oracle.

Finally, let’s not forget the price/performance metric from these benchmark results. This new Oracle result achieved US$.98/tpmC, whereas the leading IBM x86 result achieved US$.59/tpmC. That’s correct, when you determine the cost of processing each transaction for these two benchmark results IBM is 39% less expensive than Oracle. (BTW, I haven’t had a chance yet to determine if Oracle Used their Usual TPC Price/Performance Tactics for this benchmark result, as the result details are not yet available to me; but if they have, the IBM system will prove to be even less expensive again than the Oracle system.)

Benchmark results are as of January 17, 2012: Source: Transaction Processing Performance Council (TPC), http://www.tpc.org.
Oracle result: Oracle Sun Fire X4800 M2 server (8 chips/80 cores/160 threads) – 4,803,718 tpmC, US$.98/tpmC, available 06/26/12.
IBM results: IBM System p 570 server (8 chips/16 cores/32 threads) -1,616,162 tpmC, US$3.54 /tpmC, available 11/21/2007. IBM System x3850 X5 (4 chips/40 cores/80 threads) – 3,014,684 tpmC, US$.59/tpmC, available 09/22/11.

Written by Conor O'Mahony

January 18, 2012 at 11:01 am

IBM is Baking NoSQL Capabilities into DB2 and Informix

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IBM recently revealed its plan to integrate certain NoSQL capabilities into IBM DB2 and Informix. In particular, it is working to integrate graph store and key:value store capabilities into the flagship IBM database products. IBM is not yet indicating when these new capabilities will be available.

IBM does not plan to integrate all NoSQL technologies into DB2 and Informix. After all, there are many NoSQL technologies, and quite a few of them are clearly not suitable for integration into IBM’s products. The following chart summarizes the NoSQL product landscape. This landscape includes more than 100 products across a number of database categories. IBM is saying that they will integrate certain NoSQL capabilities into their products and work hand-in-hand with others NoSQL technologies.

NoSQL Landscape

Readers of this blog will know that these developments are consistent with my view that certain NoSQL technologies will eventually find themselves integrated into the major relational database products. In much the same way as the major relational database products fended off the challenge of object databases by adding features like stored procedures and user-defined functions, I expect the major relational database products to fend off the NoSQL challenge with similar tactics. And don’t forget that the major relational database products have already integrated XML capabilities, providing XQuery as an alternate query language. Its not too much of a stretch to imagine how several of these NoSQL capabilities might be supported in an optimized way as part of a relational database product.

I look forward to blogging more about this topic as news about it emerges…

Written by Conor O'Mahony

November 21, 2011 at 9:00 am

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